Boeing 757 Spotting Guide


Delta Airlines Boeing 757Boeing 757 of Delta Airlines

The Boeing 757 is a mid-size, narrow-body jet airliner powered by twin engines, and was designed and built by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. It is the Boeing's largest single-aisle, narrow-body passenger aircraft.

Background and Development of the 757

The 757 features one aisle and 3x3 seating. The 757 was intended to be more capable and more fuel efficient than the earlier Boeing 727. It shares many common design features with the Boeing 767 and pilots can obtain a common type rating to fly both the 757 and 767.

It was produced in two fuselage lengths:

  • The original 757-200 entered service in 1983; the 757-200PF, a package freighter (PF) variant, and the 757-200M, a passenger-freighter model, arrived in the late 1980s.
  • The stretched 757-300, the longest narrow-body twinjet ever produced, began service in 1999.

The U.S. Air Force operates the Boeing C-32A, a Boeing 757 variant. It is traditionally used as "Air Force Two" to transport the Vice-President, or other high-ranking members of the president's cabinet.

A total of 1,050 757 airliners were produced by Boeing from 1981 to 2004. It remains a popular aircraft in the fleet of several airlines today.

Airlines today are evaluating eventual replacements for their aging 757 fleet, including options such as the Airbus A321 and its A321neo and A321LR variants.

Boeing 757 Spotting Tips

In this photograph of a British Airways Boeing 757-200, the long and narrow fuselage is clearly seen along with its "dolphin" nose. It has high ground clearance thanks to its tall landing gears.
In this photograph of a British Airways Boeing 757-200, the long and narrow fuselage is clearly seen. It has high ground clearance thanks to its tall landing gears.

In this photograph, the dominant dolphin-shaped nose of the 757 can be seen on this American Airlines airliner. Note also the classic Boeing "V-shaped" windshield windows.
In this photograph, the dominant dolphin-shaped nose of the 757 can be seen on this American Airlines airliner. Note also the classic Boeing "V-shaped" windshield windows.


Chart showing spotting tips between the 757-200 and 757-300 models. The –200 has 3 cabin doors on each side of the fuselage along with emergency exit doors either aft of the wing or over the wing. The -300 has 4 cabins doors.
Chart showing spotting tips between the 757-200 and 757-300 models. The –200 has 3 cabin doors on each side of the fuselage along with emergency exit doors either aft of the wing or over the wing. The -300 has 4 cabins doors.


The 757–200 has 3 cabin doors on each side of the fuselage along with emergency exit doors. Seen here is a Continental Airlines Boeing 757-200.
The 757–200 has 3 doors on each side of the fuselage along with emergency exit doors over the wing. Seen here is a Continental Airlines Boeing 757-200.


Condor Boeing 757-300
Note that the Boeing 757–300 has 4 doors and 2 over-the-wing emergency exit windows on each side over the wings.


Chart showing a side-by-side comparison of the
Airbus A321 (top) and the Boeing 757 (bottom).

Note that the A321 has two 2-wheel main gear assemblies, while the 757 has two 4-wheel landing gear.

Side-by-side comparison of the Airbus A321 and the Boeing 757


Boeing 757 Photographs

Boeing 757 of Delta Airlines
Delta Airlines Boeing 757

Boeing C-32A - Air Force Two- A Boeing 757 variant
Boeing C-32 - Air Force Two- A Boeing 757 variant

 

Airliners Parked at Storage Facilities in the Desert

Jetliners in storage at the Phoenix Goodyear Airport in the Arizona desertJetliners in storage at the Phoenix Goodyear Airport in the Arizona desert, with Airbus A321-200, TC-FBT, to the left (Staff photo)

Commercial airliners have limited lifespans, even the popular Boeing 757. Ultimately, they must be retired from service, stored in "airplane boneyards" or graveyards, and finally dismantled and scrapped.

Jetliners eventually reach end-of-life due to airframe wear and/or obsolescence. Some jetliners are temporarily taken off flying status, and must be stored in a environment that is conducive to preservation. Others are kept for spare parts for flying aircraft.

To protect airliners during their storage from wind and sun damage, engines and windows are tightly covered with white, reflective materials. A sealed airliner can thus be stored safely, for years, until the time comes to return it to active duty, or salvage. Eventually, all airliners are removed permanently from service and must be "disposed" of.

Active airliner boneyards of today and military airplane boneyards after World War II ... maps, photographs, tours and more ... visit there now!

We have spotted and photographed a variety of jet airliners at several airline boneyards in the western United States, including:

  • Mojave Airport in California
  • Southern California Logistics Airport (SCLA) in Victorville, California
  • Pinal Airpark near Tucson, Arizona
  • Phoenix Goodyear Airport in Arizona

Also included is information on airplane boneyards in Europe, Australia and other locations around the world.

... and view photos of commercial airliner boneyards at www.AirplaneBoneyards.com

 

Boeing 757-200, registration N523UA, Continental Airlines, in desert storage at the Phoenix Goodyear Airport in Arizona, USA (Staff Photo)
View similar photos at AirplaneBoneyards.com
Boeing 757 in Continental Airlines livery in storage at the Phoenix Goodyear Airport in Arizona